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Artists

Mikhail Larionov

1881-1964

Mikhail Fyodorovich Larionov – June 3, 1881 – May 10, 1964 was an avant-garde Russian painter. Larionov was also the lifelong partner of fellow Russian avant-garde artist Natalia Goncharova. He was a founding member of the Jack of Diamonds (1909–1911), Moscow’s first radical independent exhibiting group, the more radical Donkey’s Tail (1912–1913), and with Goncharova he invented Rayonism (1912–1914). He was also a member of the German-based art movement known as Der Blaue Reiter. Born in Russia, he and Goncharova moved to Paris and lived there until his death.

Larionov was born at Tiraspol, in the Kherson Governorate of the Russian Empire. In 1898 he entered the Moscow School of Painting, Sculpture and Architecture under Isaac Levitan and Valentin Serov. He was suspended three times for his radical outlook. In 1900 he met fellow avant-garde artist Natalia Goncharova and formed a lifelong relationship with her.

From 1902 his style was Impressionism. After a visit to Paris in 1906 he moved into Post-Impressionism and then a Neo-primitive style which derived partly from Russian sign painting. In 1908 he staged the Golden Fleece exhibition in Moscow, which included paintings by international avant-garde artists such as Matisse, Derain, Braque, Gauguin and Van Gogh. Other group shows promoted by him included Tatlin, Chagall and Malevich.

Larionov was a founding member of two important Russian artistic groups Jack of Diamonds (1909–1911) and the more radical Donkey’s Tail (1912–1913). He gave names to both groups. His first solo show was for one day in Moscow in 1911. Larionov was influenced by the Georgian artist Niko Pirosmani.

In 1913, with Natalia Goncharova, he invented Rayonism, which was the first creation of near-abstract art in Russia. He had a one-man show at the Omega Workshops.[1] In 1915 he left Russia and worked with the ballet owner Sergei Diaghilev in Paris on the productions of the Ballets Russes. He spent the rest of his life in France and obtained French citizenship. He died, aged 82, in the Paris suburb of Fontenay-aux-Roses.

In 2001, the Central Bank of Transnistria minted a silver coin honoring this native of today’s Transnistria, as part of a series of memorable coins called The Outstanding People of Pridnestrovie.

The highest price paid for a Larionov painting at auction is 2,200,000 British pounds.

He is in the highest category “1A – a world famous artist” in “United Artists Rating”.

Natalia Gontcharova

1881-1962

Natalia Sergeevna Goncharova – June 21, 1881 – October 17, 1962 was a Russian avant-garde artist, painter, costume designer, writer, illustrator, and set designer. Goncharova’s lifelong partner was also a fellow Russian avant-garde artist Mikhail Larionov. She was a founding member of both the Jack of Diamonds (1909–1911), Moscow’s first radical independent exhibiting group, the more radical Donkey’s Tail (1912–1913), and with Larionov invented Rayonism (1912–1914). She was also a member of the German based art movement known as “Der Blaue Reiter”. Born in Russia, she moved to Paris in 1921 and lived there until her death.

Her painting vastly influenced the avant-garde in Russia. Her exhibition held in Moscow and St. Petersburg (1913 and 1914) were the first promoting a “new” artist by an independent gallery. When it comes to the pre-revolutionary period in Russia, where decorative painting and icons were a secure profession, her modern approach to rendering icons were both transgressive and problematic. Her work is usually considered too culturally specific to her Slavic heritage to be universally figured as avant-garde.

At the end of the century the gender segregation in the official art institutions was no longer implemented, but still denied women the right to get the diploma upon the completion. Still, Goncharova got training at Ilia Mashkov’s and Alexander Mikhailovsky’s studio, where she was able to study both male and female nude, and as such was trained equivalent of what she would learn upon completion at the Moscow Institute as a man. In January, 1920, a group of artist got expelled from Konstantin Korovin’s portrait class, as they were accused of copying a European Modernist painting. In that group were Larionov (Goncharova’s partner), Robert Falk, Alexander Kuprin,, Mashkov, Petr Konchalovsky, and others. They formed a first radical independent exhibitionist group which Larionov names “Jack Of Diamonds”. This title is rather a provocative name, as it both alludes of boulevard literature and the prison uniforms.

The Jack of Diamonds’ first exhibition (December 1910-11) included Primitivist and Cubist paintings by Goncharova, and in the later Donkey’s Tail exhibition (March–April 1912) organized by Larionov, more than fifty of her paintings were on display. Goncharova drew inspirations for primitivism from Russian icons and folk art, otherwise known as luboks. The Donkey’s Tail was conceived as an intentional break from European art influence and the establishment of an independent Russian school of modern art. The exhibition proved controversial, and the censor confiscated Goncharova’s religiously-themed work, The Evangelists (1910–11), deeming it blasphemous for it to be hung at an exhibition titled after the rear end of a donkey. Goncharova and her counterpart, Larionov, were continuously harassed for their artwork and the way they expressed themselves. However, the influence of Russian Futurism is much in evidence in Goncharova’s later paintings. Initially preoccupied with icon painting and the primitivism of ethnic Russian folk-art, Goncharova became famous in Russia for her Futurist work such as The Cyclist and her later Rayonist works. Goncharova and Larionav painted hieroglyphics and flowers on their faces and walked the streets as a part of a primitivist art movement. Goncharova herself sometimes appears topless in public with symbols on her chest. As leaders of the Moscow Futurists, they organized provocative lecture evenings in the same vein as their Italian counterparts. Goncharova was also involved with graphic design—writing and illustrating several avant-garde books.

Another important exhibition Goncharova participated in is called The Target (March-April 1913) and No. 4 (March-April 1914). She played a very important role when it comes to Russian art at the time. Her aesthetic choices that were bridging the Eastern and Western traditions, served as a catalyst for manifestos and art movements at the time. She was one of the leading artists in Cubo-Futurism’s (Airplane over a Train, 1912) and Rayism’s (Yellow and Green Forest, 1913) circles. Even though her pre- World War I art still had problematic associations, her participation in these exhibits were a segue for Moscow’s avant-garde blending of both Western European Modernism and Eastern traditions. In one of her interviews, she says that she got inspiration from Picasso, Le Fauconnier, and Braque, but still her first “Cubist” works to date as long as one year before that.

She started to exhibit at the Salon d’Automne (Exposition de L’art Russe) beginning in 1906.

Goncharova was a member of the avant-garde Der Blaue Reiter group from its founding in 1911. In 1915, she began to design ballet costumes and sets in Geneva. In 1915 she started work on a series of designs—Six Winged Seraph, Angel, St. Andrew, St. Mark, Nativity, and others—for a ballet commissioned by Sergei Diaghilev to be titled Liturgy. Also involved in the project, for which Igor Stravinsky was invited to compose the score, were Larionov and Léonide Massine, but the ballet never materialized.[13] Goncharova moved to Paris in 1921 where she designed a number of stage sets of Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes. She also exhibited at the Salon d’Automne in 1921, and participated regularly at the Salon des Tuileries and the Salon des Indépendants.

Goncharova also gets identified with Everythingvism (russ. Vsechestvo) as the Russian avant-garde movement. Everythingvism was considered as an extension of Neo-Primitivism. This art promotes heterogeneity, a blending of multiple cultural traditions, such as West and East and different styles such as Cubism and Futurism. It aspires to erase the boundaries between what is considered the origin and the copy, and assimilates those together. It is an art movement that is free of already set artistic laws.

Goncharova and Larionav collaborated on four charity events in Moscow. These events were the Grand Bal des Aristes, the Bal Banal, the Bal Olympique, and the Grand Ourse Bal. They both designed much of the publicity materials for the event.

Between 1922 and 1926 Goncharova created fashion designs for Marie Cuttoli’s shop, Maison Myrbor on the Rue Vincent, Paris. Her richly embroidered and appliquéd dress designs were strongly influenced by Russian folk art, Byzantine mosaic and her work for the Ballets Russes.

Together with Larionov, she left Russia and went to Paris on April 29, 1914. In this year she designed costumes and sets for the Ballets Russes’s premiere in the city of The Golden Cockerel. In 1938 Goncharova became a French citizen. On June 2, 1955, four years after Larionov suffered a stroke, the two artists got married in Paris to safeguard their rights of inheritance.[17] Influenced by the School of Paris, her style moved from Cubism nearer to Neoclassicism.[4] Goncharova was the first of the pair to die, seven years later, on October 17, 1962, in Paris after a debilitating struggle with rheumatoid arthritis.

Vladimir Tatline

1885-1953

Vladimir Tatlin ( 28 December 1885 – 31 May 1953) was a Russian and Soviet painter, architect and stage-designer. Tatlin achieved fame as the architect who designed the huge Monument to the Third International, also known as Tatlin’s Tower.This is his design for The Monument to the Third International, more commonly known as Tatlin’s Tower, which he began in 1919. With Kazimir Malevich he was one of the two most important figures in the Soviet avant-garde art movement of the 1920s, and he later became an important artist in the Constructivist movement.

Vladimir Tatlin (full name Vladimir Yevgrafovich Tatlin) was born in Kharkov, Russian Empire, now Ukraine. His father, Yevhraf Nikoforyvych Tatlin was a hereditary nobleman from Oryol, a mechanical engineer graduated from the Technological Institute in St.Petersburg and employed by the Moscow-Brest Railway in Moscow. His mother, Nadezhda Nikolaevna Tatlina (Bart), was a poet symphatizing the Narodnaya Volya revolutionary movement. After she died in 1887, his father married again and resettled to Kharkiv. His father, by whom he lived after having failed to study in Moscow School of Painting, Sculpture and Architecture died in 1904, so young Vladimir had to interrupt his studies at the Kharkov Arts School and to leave for Odessa to become a merchant sea cadet. According to his own memories, sea and distant lands gave him both means of subsistence and source of inspiration; he sailed all across the Black Sea and also to Egypt.

In 1905 he starts and in 1910 successfully completes his studies at N.Selivestrov Penza Art School in Penza. During the summer vacations he travels to Moscow and St.Petersburg to participate in various art events. In 1911 he resettled to Moscow to live by his uncle and began his art career as an icon painter. He also sang in Ukrainian and was a professional musician-bandurist, and performed as such abroad.

Tatlin became familiar with the work of Pablo Picasso during a trip to Paris in 1913.

Tatlin achieved fame as the architect who designed the huge Monument to the Third International, also known as Tatlin’s Tower. Planned from 1919,[2] the monument was to be a tall tower in iron, glass and steel which would have dwarfed the Eiffel Tower in Paris (the Monument to the Third International was a third taller at 400 meters high). Inside the iron-and-steel structure of twin spirals, the design envisaged three building blocks, covered with glass windows, which would rotate at different speeds (the first one, a cube, once a year; the second one, a pyramid, once a month; the third one, a cylinder, once a day). For financial and practical reasons, however, the tower was never built.

Tatlin was also regarded as a progenitor of Soviet post-Revolutionary Constructivist art with his pre-Revolutionary counter-reliefs, three-dimensional constructions made of wood and metal,[10] some placed in corners (corner counter-reliefs) and others more conventionally. Tatlin conceived these sculptures in order to question the traditional ideas of art, though he did not regard himself as a Constructivist and objected to many of the movement’s ideas. Later prominent constructivists included Varvara Stepanova, Alexander Rodchenko, Manuel Rendón Seminario, Joaquín Torres García, László Moholy-Nagy, Antoine Pevsner and Naum Gabo.

Although colleagues at the beginning of their careers, Tatlin and Malevich quarrelled fiercely and publicly at the time of the 0.10 Exhibition in 1915 (long before the birth of Constructivism), also called “the last futurist exhibition”, apparently over the ‘suprematist’ works Malevich exhibited there. This led Malevich to develop his ideas further in the city of Vitebsk, where he found a school called UNOVIS (Champions of the new art).

Tatlin also dedicated himself to the study of clothes, objects and so on. At the end of his life he started to research bird flight, in order to pursue one of the great dreams of humanity: to fly.[citation needed]

In the year of 1930 he taught in Kiev where one of his students was Joseph Karakis.

From 1930-ties Tatlin works for the different theatres in Moscow and during the Great Patriotic War, in Gorkiy. In 1948 he was heavily criticized for his allegedly anti-communist stance and lost his job, but was not repressed.

Tatlin died in 1953 in Moscow and was buried at the Novodevichy Cemetery.

Olga Rozanova

1886-1918

Olga Vladimirovna Rozanova  (22 June 1886 – 7 November 1918, Moscow) was a Russian avant-garde artist in the styles of Suprematism, Neo-Primitivism, and Cubo-Futurism.

Olga Rozanova was born in Melenki, a small town near Vladimir. Her father, Vladimir Rozanov, was a district police officer and her mother, Elizaveta Rozanova, was the daughter of an Orthodox priest. She was the family’s fifth child; she had two sisters, Anna and Alevtina, and two brothers, Anatolii and Vladimir.

She graduated from the Vladimir Women’s Gymnasium in 1904 and moved to Moscow. After arriving in Moscow, she attended the Bolshakov Art School, where she worked under Nikolai Ulyanov and sculptor Andrey Matveev. She audited courses at the Stroganov School of Applied Art in 1907 but was not accepted for admission. After this, she trained in the private studio of Konstantin Yuon. From 1907 to 1910, fellow drawing and painting students studying in these private studios included Lyubov Popova, Nadezhda Udaltsova, Aleksei Kruchenykh, and Serge Charchoune.

She joined Soyuz Molodyozhi (Union of Youth) in 1911. Two of her canvases, Nature-morte and The Cafe debuted at the second Soyuz Molodyozhi exhibition in St. Petersburg in April 1911. She moved to Saint Petersburg in 1912 and briefly studied at the art school of Elizabeta Zvantseva, which housed many Russian art nouveau artists. She exhibited two works, Portrait, and Still-Life at the next Soyuz Molodyozhi exhibition in January 1912. This exhibition was the first appearance of the Donkey’s Tail, a Moscow-based artistic group led by Mikhail Larionov. Rozanova later traveled to Moscow to try to establish joint projects between the two groups; these negotiations proved to be unsuccessful. Soyuz Molodyozhi disbanded in 1914.

Of all of the Russian Cubo-Futurists, Rozanova’s work most closely upholds the ideals of Italian Futurism. During Filippo Tommaso Marinetti’s visit to Russia in 1914, he was very impressed with her work. Rozanova later exhibited four works in the First Free International Futurist Exhibition in Rome, which took place from April 13 to May 25, 1914. Other Russian artists featured in the exhibition included Alexander Archipenko, Nikolai Kulbin, and Aleksandra Ekster.

In 1916 she married Aleksei Kruchenykh and joined the group of Russian avant-garde artists Supremus that was led by Kazimir Malevich. By this time her paintings developed from the influences of Cubism and Italian Futurism and took an entirely original departure into pure abstraction in which the composition is organized by the visual weight and relationship of color.

In the same year Rozanova together with other Suprematist artists (Kazimir Malevich, Aleksandra Ekster, Nina Genke, Liubov Popova, Ksenia Boguslavskaya, Nadezhda Udaltsova, Ivan Kliun, Ivan Puni and others) worked at the Verbovka Village Folk Centre.

From 1917 to 1918 she created a series of non-objective paintings which she called tsv’etopis’. Her Non-objective composition, 1918 also known as Green stripe anticipates the flat picture plane and poetic nuancing of color of some Abstract Expressionists.

She died of diphtheria at the age of 32 in 1918 following a cold she contracted while working on preparations for the first anniversary of the October Revolution.

Her work is in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Carnegie Museum of Art, and the Harvard Art Museums.

Alexandre Rodtchenko

1891-1956

Aleksander Mikhailovich Rodchenko 5 December 1891 – December 3, 1956) was a Russian artist, sculptor, photographer and graphic designer. He was one of the founders of constructivism and Russian design; he was married to the artist Varvara Stepanova.

Rodchenko was one of the most versatile Constructivist and Productivist artists to emerge after the Russian Revolution. He worked as a painter and graphic designer before turning to photomontage and photography. His photography was socially engaged, formally innovative, and opposed to a painterly aesthetic. Concerned with the need for analytical-documentary photo series, he often shot his subjects from odd angles—usually high above or down below—to shock the viewer and to postpone recognition. He wrote: “One has to take several different shots of a subject, from different points of view and in different situations, as if one examined it in the round rather than looked through the same key-hole again and again.”

Rodchenko was born in St. Petersburg to a working-class family who moved to Kazan after the death of his father, in 1909. He became an artist without having had any exposure to the art world, drawing much inspiration from art magazines. In 1910, Rodchenko began studies under Nicolai Fechin and Georgii Medvedev at the Kazan Art School, where he met Varvara Stepanova, whom he later married.

After 1914, he continued his artistic training at the Stroganov Institute in Moscow, where he created his first abstract drawings, influenced by the Suprematism of Kazimir Malevich, in 1915. The following year, he participated in “The Store” exhibition organized by Vladimir Tatlin, who was another formative influence.

Rodchenko’s work was heavily influenced by Cubism and Futurism, as well as by Malevich’s Suprematist compositions, which featured geometric forms deployed against a white background. While Rodchenko was a student of Tatlin’s he was also his assistant, and the interest in figuration that characterized Rodchenko’s early work disappeared as he experimented with the elements of design. He utilized a compass and ruler in creating his paintings, with the goal of eliminating expressive brushwork.

Rodchenko worked in Narkompros and he was one of the organizers of RABIS. RABIS was formed in 1919–1920.

Rodchenko was appointed Director of the Museum Bureau and Purchasing Fund by the Bolshevik Government in 1920, responsible for the reorganization of art schools and museums. He became secretary of the Moscow Artists’ Union and set up the Fine Arts Division of the People’s Commissariat for Education, and helped found the Institute for Artistic Culture.

He taught from 1920 to 1930 at the Higher Technical-Artistic Studios (VKhUTEMAS/VKhUTEIN), a Bauhaus organization with a “checkered career”. It was disbanded in 1930.

In 1921 he became a member of the Productivist group, with Stepanova and Aleksei Gan, which advocated the incorporation of art into everyday life. He gave up painting in order to concentrate on graphic design for posters, books, and films. He was deeply influenced by the ideas and practice of the filmmaker Dziga Vertov, with whom he worked intensively in 1922.

Impressed by the photomontage of the German Dadaists, Rodchenko began his own experiments in the medium, first employing found images in 1923, and from 1924 on, shooting his own photographs as well.[5] His first published photomontage illustrated Mayakovsky’s poem, “About This”, in 1923. In 1924, Rodchenko produced what is likely his most famous poster, an advertisement for the Lengiz Publishing House sometimes titled “Books”, which features a young woman with a cupped hand shouting “книги по всем отраслям знания” (Books in all branches of knowledge), printed in modernist typography.

From 1923 to 1928 Rodchenko collaborated closely with Mayakovsky (of whom he took several portraits) on the design and layout of LEF and Novy LEF, the publications of Constructivist artists. Many of his photographs appeared in or were used as covers for these and other journals. His images eliminated unnecessary detail, emphasized dynamic diagonal composition, and were concerned with the placement and movement of objects in space. During this period, he and Stepanova painted the well-known panels of the Mosselprom building in Moscow. Their daughter, Varvara Rodchenko, was born in 1925.

Throughout the 1920s, Rodchenko’s work was very abstract. Rodchenko joined the October Group of artists in 1928 but was expelled three years later, charged with “formalism”, an accusation first raised in the pages of Sovetskoe Foto in 1928.[8] In the 1930s, with the changing Party guidelines governing artistic practice in favour of Socialist Realism, he concentrated on sports photography and images of parades and other choreographed movements. He returned to painting in the late 1930s, stopped photographing in 1942, and produced abstract expressionist works in the 1940s. He continued to organize photography exhibitions for the government during these years. He died in Moscow in 1956.

Lioubov Popova

1889-1924

Lyubov Sergeyevna Popova  (April 24, 1889 – May 25, 1924) was a Russian avant-garde artist (Cubist, Suprematist and Constructivist), painter and designer.

Popova was born in Ivanovskoe, near Moscow, to the wealthy family of Sergei Maximovich Popov, a very successful textile merchant and vigorous patron of the arts, and Lyubov Vasilievna Zubova, who came from a highly cultured family. Lyubov Sergeyevna had two brothers and a sister: Sergei was the eldest, then Lyubov, Pavel and Olga. Pavel became a philosopher and the guardian of his sister’s artistic legacy.

Popova grew up with a strong interest in art, especially Italian Renaissance painting. At eleven years old she began formal art lessons at home; she was first enrolled in Yaltinskaia’s Women’s Gymnasium, then in Arseneva’s Gymnasium in Moscow. By the age of 18 she was studying with Stanislav Zhukovsky, and in 1908 entered the private studios of Konstantin Yuon and Ivan Dudin. In 1912 to 1913, she began attending the studios of the Cubist painters Henri Le Fauconnier and Jean Metzinger at Académie de La Palette in Paris.

Cubo-Futurism

The Model, 1913

The Pianist, 1914, National Gallery of Canada
Popova was one of the first female pioneers in Cubo-Futurism. Through a synthesis of styles she worked towards what she termed painterly architectonics. After first exploring Impressionism, by 1913, in Composition with Figures, she was experimenting with the particularly Russian development of Cubo-Futurism: a fusion of two equal influences from France and Italy.

From 1914–1915 her Moscow home became the meeting-place for artists and writers. In 1914–1916 Popova together with other avant-garde artists (Aleksandra Ekster, Nadezhda Udaltsova, Olga Rozanova) contributed to the two Knave of Diamonds exhibitions, in Petrograd Tramway V and the 0.10, The Store in Moscow. An analysis of Popova’s cubo-futurist work also suggests an affinity with the work of Fernand Leger, whose geometry of tubular and conical forms in his series of paintings from 1913–1914 is similar to that in Popova’s paintings.

SuprematismHer painting The Violin of 1914 suggests the development from Cubism towards the “painterly architectonics” series of 1916–1918. This series defined her distinct artistic trajectory in abstract form. The canvas surface is an energy field of overlapping and intersecting angular planes in a constant state of potential release of energy. At the same time the elements are held in a balanced and proportioned whole as if linking the compositions of the classical past to the future. Color is used as the iconic focus; the strong primary color at the center drawing the outer shapes together.

Portrait of a Philosopher (Artist’s brother, Pavel Sergeyevich Popov), 1915
In 1916 she joined the Supremus group with Kazimir Malevich, the founder of Suprematism, Aleksandra Ekster, Ivan Kliun, Nadezhda Udaltsova, Olga Rozanova, Ivan Puni, Nina Genke, Ksenia Boguslavskaya and others who at this time worked in Verbovka Village Folk Centre. The creation of a new kind of painting was part of the revolutionary urge of the Russian avant-garde to remake the world. The term ‘supreme’ refers to a ‘non-objective’ or abstract world beyond that of everyday reality. However, there was a tension between those who, like Malevich, saw art as a spiritual quest, and others who responded to the need for the artist to create a new physical world.[5] Popova embraced both of these ideals but eventually identified herself entirely with the aims of the Revolution working in poster, book design, fabric and theatre design, as well as teaching. At 0.10 she had exhibited a number of figurative painted cardboard reliefs in a cubist derived style. In 1916 she began to paint completely abstract Suprematist compositions, but the title “Painterly Architectonics” (which she gave to many of her paintings) suggests that, even as a Suprematist, Popova was more interested in painting as a projection of material reality than as the personal expression of a metaphysical reality. Popova’s superimposed planes and strong color have the objective presence of actual space and materials.

In 1918 Popova married the art historian Boris von Eding, and gave birth to a son. Von Eding died the following year of typhoid fever. Popova was also seriously ill but recovered.

Constructivism
As early as 1917 in parallel with her Suprematist work, she had made fabric designs and worked on Agitprop books and posters, In the Tenth State Exhibition: Non Objective Creativity and Suprematism, 1918, she contributed the architectonic series of paintings. She continued painting advanced abstract works until 1921. In the 5 x 5 Exhibition of 1921, Popova and her four fellow Constructivists declared that easel painting was to be abandoned and all creative work was to be for the people and the making of the new society. Popova worked in a broad range of mediums and disciplines, including painting, relief, works on paper, and designs for the theater, textiles, and typography. Popova did not join the Working Group of Constructivists when it was set up in Moscow in March 1921, but joined by the end of 1921. In 1923 she began creating designs for fabric to be manufactured by the First State Textile Printing Works in Moscow.

From 1921 to 1924 Popova became entirely involved in Constructivist projects, sometimes in collaboration with Varvara Stepanova, the architect Alexander Vesnin and Alexander Rodchenko. She produced stage designs: Vsevolod Meyerhold’s production of Fernand Crommelynck’s The Magnanimous Cuckold, 1922; her Spatial Force Constructions were used as the basis of her art teaching theory at Vkhutemas. She designed typography of books, production art and textiles, and contributed designs for dresses to LEF.

She worked briefly in the Cotton Printing Factory in Moscow with Varvara Stepanova.

Nadiejda Oudaltsova

1886-1961

Nadezhda Udaltsova was born in the village of Orel, Russia, on December 29, 1885. When she was six, her family moved to Moscow, where she graduated from high school and began her artistic career. In September 1905 Udaltsova enrolled in the art school run by Konstantin Yuon and Ivan Dudin, where she studied for two years and met fellow-students Vera Mukhina, Liubov Popova, and Aleksander Vesnin. In the spring of 1908 she traveled to Berlin and Dresden, and upon her return to Russia, she unsuccessfully applied for admission to the Moscow Institute of Painting, Sculpture, and Architecture. In 1910–11, Udaltsova studied at several private studios, among them Tatlin’s Tower. In 1912–13 she and Popova traveled to Paris to continue their studies under the tutelage of Henri Le Fauconnier, Jean Metzinger and André Segonzac at Académie de La Palette. Udaltsova returned to Moscow in 1913 and worked in Vladimir Tatlin’s studio together with Popova, Vesnin, and others.

Udaltsova’s professional debut was as a participant in a Jack of Diamonds exhibition in Moscow in the winter of 1914.[5] But it was in 1915 that she really made her name as a Cubist artist, participating in three major exhibitions in that single year, including “Tramway V” (February), “Exhibition of Leftist Tendencies” (April), and “The Last Futurist Exhibition: 0.10” (December). Her paintings were subsequently collected and exhibited in the 1920s by the Tretiakov Gallery, the Russian Museum, and other venues as examples of Russian Cubism.

Under the influence of Tatlin, Udaltsova experimented with Constructivism, but eventually embraced the more painterly approach of the Suprematist movement. In 1916, she participated with other Suprematist artists in a Jack of Diamonds exhibition, and during that same time period she joined Kazimir Malevich’s Supremus group. In 1915–1916, together with other suprematist artists (Kazimir Malevich, Aleksandra Ekster, Liubov Popova, Nina Genke, Olga Rozanova, Ivan Kliun, Ivan Puni, Ksenia Boguslavskaya and others) worked at the Verbovka Village Folk Centre.

 

Ilia Tchachnik

1902-1929

Ilya Grigorevich Chashnik (1902, Lucyn, Russian Empire, currently Ludza, Latvia – 1929, Leningrad) was a suprematist artist, a pupil of Kazimir Malevich and a founding member of the UNOVIS school.

Chashnik was born to a Jewish family in 1902, Lucyn, Russian Empire, currently Ludza, Latvia.

Chashnik was notably able in a variety of media. Aleksandra Semenovna Shatskikh describes him as “famous for his inexhaustible inventiveness and ability to apply Suprematist principles to virtually all forms of art, including easel painting.”He painted, was proficient in metalwork, and designed ceramics produced at the Imperial Porcelain Factory (then known as the Lomonosov Porcelain Factory).

He died in 1929 in Leningrad, at the age of 27.

The University of Texas at Austin held an exhibition dedicated to his works in 1981.

Jean Pougny

1894-1956

Ivan Puni or Puny20 February 1892 – 28 December 1956) was a Russian avant-garde artist (Suprematist, Cubo-Futurist).

Ivan Puni was born in Kuokkala (then Grand Duchy of Finland in the Russian Empire, now Repino in Russia) to a family of Italian origins.[4] He is the grandson of an eminent Italian composer of ballet music, Cesare Pugni.

Puni received his formal training in Paris in 1910-11 at the Académie Julien and other schools, where he painted in a derivative fauviste style. Upon his return to Russia in 1912, he met, and exhibited with, members of the St Petersburg avant-garde, including Kazimir Malevich and Vladimir Tatlin. He made a second trip to Paris in 1914, returning to St. Petersburg in 1915. At this point, he began painting in a Cubist style reminiscent of Juan Gris. In 1915, Puni, (Aleksandra Ekster, Liubov Popova, Ivan Kliun, Ksenia Boguslavskaya, Olga Rozanova, Nadezhda Udaltsova, Nina Genke and others) formed Supremus, a group of artists dedicated to the promulgation of Suprematism, the abstract art movement founded by Malevich. Malevich and Puni co-authored the Suprematist Manifesto, published in 1916, which proclaimed a new, abstract art for a new historical era. Puni also organized the exhibitions Tramway 5 and 0.10, both held in St Petersburg in 1915, in which Malevich, Tatlin, Popova and others participated, and to which Puni contributed constructions and paintings. In 1915-1916 Puni, together with other Suprematist artists, worked at Verbovka Village Folk Centre. In 1919, he taught at the Vitebsk Art School under Marc Chagall.

Puni and his wife, Kseniya Boguslavskaya, emigrated from Russia in 1919, first to Finland, then in 1920 to Berlin, where the first exhibition consisting entirely of his work was held at the Galerie der Sturm. While in Berlin, Puni also designed costumes and sets for theatrical productions. Puni and Boguslavskaya relocated to Paris in 1924, where his style changed once again to a variant of Impressionism. In France, he signed his work Jean Pougny in an effort to distance his new art practice from his previous one in Russia. In 1946, Puni/Pougny became a French citizen. He died in Paris in 1956.

Nadiejda Oudaltsova

1886-1961

El Lissitzky

1890-1941

Lazar Markovich Lissitzky : November 23 1890 – December 30, 1941, known as El Lissitzky (Russian: Эль Лиси́цкий, Yiddish: על ליסיצקי‎), was a Russian artist, designer, photographer, typographer, polemicist and architect. He was an important figure of the Russian avant-garde, helping develop suprematism with his mentor, Kazimir Malevich, and designing numerous exhibition displays and propaganda works for the Soviet Union. His work greatly influenced the Bauhaus and constructivist movements, and he experimented with production techniques and stylistic devices that would go on to dominate 20th-century graphic design.[1]

Lissitzky’s entire career was laced with the belief that the artist could be an agent for change, later summarized with his edict, “das zielbewußte Schaffen” (goal-oriented creation).[2] Lissitzky, of Lithuanian Jewish оrigin, began his career illustrating Yiddish children’s books in an effort to promote Jewish culture in Russia. When only 15 he started teaching, a duty he would maintain for most of his life. Over the years, he taught in a variety of positions, schools, and artistic media, spreading and exchanging ideas. He took this ethic with him when he worked with Malevich in heading the suprematist art group UNOVIS, when he developed a variant suprematist series of his own, Proun, and further still in 1921, when he took up a job as the Russian cultural ambassador to Weimar Germany, working with and influencing important figures of the Bauhaus and De Stijl movements during his stay. In his remaining years he brought significant innovation and change to typography, exhibition design, photomontage, and book design, producing critically respected works and winning international acclaim for his exhibition design. This continued until his deathbed, where in 1941 he produced one of his last works – a Soviet propaganda poster rallying the people to construct more tanks for the fight against Nazi Germany. In 2014, the heirs of the artist, in collaboration with Van Abbemuseum and leading worldwide scholars on the subject, established the Lissitzky Foundation in order to preserve the artist’s legacy and to prepare a catalogue raisonné of the artist’s oeuvre.

 

Gustav Klucis

1895-1938

Gustav Klutsis : January 4, 1895 – February 26, 1938  was a pioneering Latvian photographer and major member of the Constructivist avant-garde in the early 20th century. He is known for the Soviet revolutionary and Stalinist propaganda he produced with his wife Valentina Kulagina.

Born in Ķoņi parish, near Rūjiena, Klucis began his artistic training in Riga in 1912.[1] In 1915 he was drafted into the Russian Army, serving in a Latvian riflemen detachment, then went to Moscow in 1917. In the next three years he began art studies under Kazimir Malevich and Antoine Pevsner, joined the Communist Party, met and married longtime collaborator Valentina Kulagina, and graduated from the state-run art school VKhUTEMAS. He would continue to be associated with VKhUTEMAS as a professor of color theory from 1924 until the school closed in 1930.

Klucis taught, wrote, and produced political art for the Soviet state for the rest of his life. As the political background degraded through the 1920s and 1930s, Klutsis and Kulagina came under increasing pressure to limit their subject matter and techniques. Once joyful, revolutionary and utopian, by 1935 their art was devoted to furthering Joseph Stalin’s cult of personality.

Despite his active and loyal service to the party, Klucis was arrested in Moscow on January 16, 1938, as a part of the so-called “Latvian Operation” as he prepared to leave for the New York World’s Fair. Kulagina agonized for months, then years, over his disappearance. His sentence was passed by the NKVD Commission and the USSR Prosecutor’s Office on February 11, 1938, and he was executed on February 26, 1938, at the Butovo NKVD training ground near Moscow. He was rehabilitated on August 25, 1956 for lack of corpus delicti.

Klutsis worked in a variety of experimental media. He liked to use propaganda as a sign or revolutionary background image. His first project of note, in 1922, was a series of semi-portable multimedia agitprop kiosks to be installed on the streets of Moscow, integrating “radio-orators”, film screens, and newsprint displays, all to celebrate the fifth anniversary of the Revolution. Like other Constructivists he worked in sculpture, produced exhibition installations, illustrations and ephemera.

But Klutsis and Kulagina are primarily known for their photo montages. The names of some of their best posters, such as “Electrification of the whole country” (1920), “There can be no revolutionary movement without a revolutionary theory” (1927), and “Field shock workers into the fight for the socialist reconstruction” (1932), belied the fresh, powerful, and sometimes eerie images. For economy they often posed for, and inserted themselves into, these images, disguised as shock workers or peasants. Their dynamic compositions, distortions of scale and space, angled viewpoints and colliding perspectives make them perpetually modern.

Klutsis is one of four artists with a claim to having invented the subgenre of political photo montage in 1918 (along with the German Dadaists Hannah Höch and Raoul Hausmann, and the Russian El Lissitzky). He worked alongside Lissitzky on the Pressa International exhibition in Cologne.

Ivan Klioune

1873-1943

Ivan Vasilievich Kliun, or Klyun, born Klyunkov:1 September 1873, Bolshiye Gorky, Petushinsky District – 13 December 1943, Moscow, was a Russian Avant-Garde painter, sculptor and art theorist, associated with the Suprematist movement.

His father was a carpenter. In 1881, seeking to improve their economic condition, the family moved to Kyiv. In 1890, they moved again, to Russian Poland. He received his initial artistic education at the Society for the Encouragement of the Fine Arts [pl] in Warsaw, in the 1890s, while working as an accountant. In 1898, he relocated to Moscow, where he frequented the studios of Fyodor Rerberg [ru] and Ilya Mashkov.

His most important contact, however, came in 1907 when he met Kazimir Malevich and was introduced to the Russian Avant-Garde. This influenced him profoundly, although he joined the Moscow Salon [ru] when it was created in 1910 and remained a member until 1916. He originally worked in the Symboloist style but, in 1913, due to the influence of Malevich, he began exhibiting with a group from St. Petersburg known as the “Soyuz Molodyozhi” (Union of Youth). At this time, he became fond of Cubo-Futurism, began producing sculpture (under the influence of Vladimir Tatlin and later exhibited with several other Avant-Garde groups.

In 1915, he provided lithographs and a short chapter for the book, Тайные пороки академиков (The Secret Vices of Academicians) by the poet Aleksei Kruchyonykh. The book was a harsh criticism of Symbolism and decadence in general. That same year he became a follower of Malevich’s Suprematism and, the following year, joined his group known as Supremus. While there, he helped prepare a manifesto and a journal that was never published. He also collaborated with the Verbovka Village Folk Centre; working with peasant artisans.

From 1918 to 1921, he was a Professor at Vkhutemas, the state art and technical school. From 1920, he was a member of Inkhuk (the Institute of Artistic Culture) and, after 1921, a Corresponding Member of GAHN (State Academy of Art Sciences).

Until the mid 1920s, his works were largely geometric forms. In the late 1920s, he developed an interest in modern Western European art, especially the French; copying works by Picasso and Braque. He was especially attracted to the works of Amédée Ozenfant. In the early 1930s, he created numerous still-lifes in the Purist style. From the mid 1930s on he, and most Soviet artists, were compelled to paint works of Social Realism. In response, he created realistic still-lifes and landscapes and gave them away to friends and family

Robert Falk

1886-1958

Robert Rafailovich Falk: 1886 – October 1, 1958, was a Russian painter.

Falk was born in Moscow in 1886. In 1903 to 1904 he studied art in the studios of Konstantin Yuon and Ilya Mashkov, in 1905 to 1909 he studied at the Moscow School of Painting, Sculpture and Architecture with Konstantin Korovin and Valentin Serov.

In 1910, Falk was of the founders and the most active participants of artistic group Jack of Diamonds. The group considered Paul Cézanne the only painter worth following, and the rest of visual art to be too trivial and bourgeois. The distinctive feature of Falk’s paintings of the time was sculpturing of the form using many layers of different paints.

Robert Falk,Still life: Bottles and a Jug. 1912
In 1918-1928, Falk taught at VKhUTEMAS (State Higher Artistic and Technical Workshops). In 1928 Falk went on a supposedly short trip to France and refused to return; he worked in Paris until 1938, when he returned to Moscow.

After 1938, until his death in 1958 he worked in Moscow, most of the time in isolation. His works of that time were in neo-impressionist style with characteristic white-on-white colors (not unlike the later paintings of his teacher Valentin Serov).

During the Khrushchev Thaw Falk became popular among young painters and many considered him to be the main bridge between the traditions of the Russian and French Moderne of the beginning of 20th century and Russian avant-garde and the Russian avant-garde of the 1960s.

There are numerous paintings by Falk in the New Tretyakov Art Museum in Moscow.

Georges Annenkov

1889-1974

Yury Pavlovich Annenkov ; 23 July 1889 in Petropavlovsk, Akmolinsk Oblast, Russian Empire – 12 July 1974 in Paris, France, was a Russian artist mostly known for his book illustrations and portraits. He also worked for theatre and cinema (design). A member of Mir Iskusstva.

In his essay “On Synthetism” (1922), Yevgeny Zamyatin writes that “[Annenkov] has a keen awareness of the extraordinary rush and dynamism of our epoch. His sense of time is developed to the hundredth of a second. He has the knack–characteristic of Synthetism–of giving only the synthetic essence of things.”

Yury Annenkov was born into a well-known family (among his ancestors was Pavel Annenkov, Alexander Pushkin’s publisher); his father, Pavel Annenkov was involved with revolutionary activities that led him to exile in Siberia. The Annenkovs moved back to St. Petersburg in 1892.

In 1908, Annenkov entered the University of St. Petersburg and attended Savely Seidenberg’s studio classes, together with Marc Chagall. Next year, 1909, he attended Jan Ciągliński’s studio. In 1911-1912, Annenkov moved to Paris to work in the studios of Maurice Denis and Félix Vallotton. In 1913, Annenkov worked in Switzerland. Upon his return to St. Petersburg in 1914, Annenkov mostly contributed to magazines (Satirikon, Teatr i Iskusstvo, Otechestvo) and worked for theatres.

Maxim Gorky’s fairy-tale book, Samovar, published in 1917 was his first work as a book designer. His recognition as a book illustrator came in the wake of his most known work — designing Alexander Blok’s poem, The Twelve, published in 1918 and gone through three printings within a year. In the next few years Annenkov designed numerous books for Petrograd authors (Mikhail Kuzmin and Aleksey Remizov, to name a few). In 1919 Annenkov designed and staged “First Distiller, or How an Imp Earned a Hunk of Bread”, a comedy by Count Lev Tolstoi.

Commissioned by the Bolshevik government, Annenkov together with Mstislav Dobuzhinsky, S. Maslovski and A. Kugel, designed and staged the open-air mystery “Liberated Labour Anthem” on 1 May 1920 in Petrograd. Later that year, Annenkov staged and designed another mass show, The Storming of the Winter Palace, part of the October Revolution anniversary celebrations in Palace Square, Petrograd. In 1919-1920 Annenkov made a series of abstract sculptural assemblages and collages, influenced by the Dada movement.

1922 saw his book “Portraits”. It contained 80 pictures of the key-figures of Russian art of the time (Gorki, Zamyatin, Remizov, Sologub, Blok, Akhmatova a.o.) made in 1906-1921. The book also included essays by Yevgeny Zamyatin and Mikhail Kuzmin. He joined the Mir Iskusstva.

Annenkov left Russia in July 1924, first living in Germany and later settling in Paris. He continued to work as an artist and served as a costume designer for motion pictures. He was co-nominated with Rosine Delamare for the Academy Award for Best Costume Design for their work in the film The Earrings of Madame de… (1953).

ANDRÉ LANSKOY

1902-1976

André Lanskoy (31 March 1902 – 24 August 1976) was a Russian painter and printmaker who worked in France. He is associated with the School of Paris and Tachisme, an abstract painting movement that began during the 1940s.

He was born in Moscow. After 1905, the family moved to St. Petersburg, the capital in 1909. In 1918, he moved to Kiev where he painted his first paintings. During the Russian Civil War he fought in the White Army. After an injury he moved to Constantinople and in 1921, he went to Paris. Recalling his arrival in the French capital, Lanskoy said: “Literally in the first night I started to paint and I haven’t stopped since.” In Paris, he met Serge Poliakoff, Jean-Michel Coulon and later Nicolas de Staël.

Lanskoy spent a lot of time at museums and was influenced by James Ensor’s and Vincent van Gogh’s use of color. In 1923, he participated in his first group exhibitions of Russian painters at the La Licorne Gallery in Paris. Wilhelm Uhde discovered Lanskoy’s paintings at the Salon d’Automne in 1924 and became a collector of his works in the years that followed. In 1925, Lanskoy had a solo exhibition and his works were acquired by museums and important private collectors. After 1937, his paintings began a transition towards abstraction and he studied both Paul Klee and Wassily Kandinsky.

After 1942, he painted only abstract works. The interaction of form and color became the major theme running through his oeuvre: “Even though every brushstroke represents for itself a transformed reality, it receives its true meaning in the context of surrounding shades of color.” In 1944, Lanskoy exhibited at the Jeanne Bucher Gallery in Paris where he met Nicolas de Staël. In 1948, he showed at the Louis Carré Gallery and in 1951 at the Galerie Jacques Dubourg. The Tooth and Sons Gallery showed his work in 1953 and The Loeb Gallery in New York City followed in 1959. In 1962, he began to work on a large project of original prints and collages to accompany Nikolai Gogol’s novel Diary of a Madman. He worked for fourteen years until his death on this project resulting in 150 collages and 80 lithographs. In 1966 he had an exhibition at the Museé Galliéra, Paris. The Neue Galerie in Zürich held an exhibition in 1969. Lanskoy died on 24 August 1976 in Paris. The Aras Gallery collected the extensive Diary of a Madman series of prints and staged a major posthumous exhibition in 1989.

MAXIM KANTOR

1957-now

Maxim Kantor was born in Moscow on 22 December 1957, he’s a painter, writer, essayiste and Art historian of an openly philosophical turn.

His father, Karl Kantor, who was born in Argentina, was a philosopher, an art historian, and a design theorist who founded the Moscow magazine “Decorative Arts”. His grandfather self-exiled to Argentina in 1909 and returned to Soviet Russia with his family in 1926. His mother Tatiana was a geneticist who created some hybrids that were internationally licensed.

In 1980 Maxim Kantor graduated from the Moscow State University of Printing Art. After 1982 he took part in unofficial exhibitions. In 1983 he founded in Moscow the underground art group “Krasnyj Dom” (Red House). In 1984 he was organizer and speaker of a renowned one-day show of the group in Moscow Institute of Philosophy.

In 2016 he became a German citizen.

Maxim Kantor lives and works on Ile de Ré (France), Berlin and Oxford.

Kantor is a member of the Russian Academy of Fine Arts.

As a painter Maxim Kantor “didn’t want to study under anybody and his father (the philosopher Karl Kantor) was all he needed”, but he was deeply influenced by Michelangelo, Mantegna, Goya, Breughel, Van Gogh, Grunewald and Petrov Vodkin. Maxim Kantor never joined any artistic group, but rather kept to his own independent message. His personal style was never influenced by fashions or current streams. In Soviet times he became a watchful observer of society and a sharp political critic. Kantor holds the same line up to now both in his country and in the West. For years, he has been developing the themes which moved him. Almost always those themes reflected socio-political situation in his Motherland or in the world. He created series of large paintings and graphic works which always dovetailed with his fiction works and public statements and essays.

In 1997 he represented the Russian Federation on 47 Biennale d’Arte di Venezia in the Russian pavilion with the personal Exhibition Criminal Chronicle.

He held exhibitions in many different countries and in a great number of important museums around the world, among which Moscow State Tretyakov Gallery, Saint-Petersburg State Russian Museum, Hannover Sprengel Museum, Frankfurt Staedel Museum, British Museum, Luxembourg National Museum. Some works by Kantor are in the Vatican Pontifical Academy of Sciences, Paris Saint Merry Church and the Brussels cathedral.

Maxim Kantor has created three more monumental portfolio of etchings and prints with the following titles Metropolis. Atlas (2000-2001), Metropolis. Atlas (2004) and Vulcanus. Atlas (2010).

Maxim Kantor produced “livres d’artiste”: in 2013 Henrich von Kleist. Die “Hermannsschlaht” and in 2014 “The Ballades of Robin Hood”, in 2018 “Faust” and “Hazard” with text and illustrations by Kantor himself.

MICHEL COMTE

1954-now

Michel Comte (born February 19, 1954) is a filmmaker and a fashion, portrait photographer. He regularly works with Vogue Italia, l’Uomo Vogue, Interview, Vanity Fair etc. He directed and produced The Girl from Nagasaki, his first feature film in 3D, which premiered at Sundance Film Festival in 2014.

Comte was born in February 19, 1954 in Zürich, Switzerland. His grandfather was a Swiss aviation pioneer Alfred Comte. Comte studied in England and in France, then started his career in contemporary art restoration, specializing in the works of Andy Warhol and Yves Klein. He was interested in photography and when moving to Paris in 1979, he was discovered by Karl Lagerfeld, who gave him first international assignment for the fashion house of Chloe. Comte then started working for such publications as Vogue US, Vogue Italia, Per Lui, Vanity Fair, and fashion houses such as Emanuel Ungaro, Chanel, Giorgio Armani and so on.

Comte produced many portraits including Jeremy Irons, Louise Bourgeois, Mike Tyson, Akira Kurosawa, Sharon Stone, Carla Bruni, Naomi Campbell, Helena Christensen, Miles Davis, Vanessa Paradis. Many of his images are shot for his long-time friend and influencer Franca Sozzani, an editor-in-chief of Vogue Italia. He continues to shoot for Vogue Italia. His advertising projects include Dolce & Gabbana, Nike, Lancôme, Ferrari, Jaguar, Mercedes Benz, BMW, Hennessy, Davidoff, Gianfranco Ferre, Hermes, Trussardi, Pomellato, Celine, Givenchy, Zeiss and so on. He was awarded as Photographer of the year 2000 by PHOTO magazine.[citation needed]

Comte also followed the career of F1 driver Michael Schumacher.

Comte is involved in photo-reportage and documentary. In collaboration with Pomellato and International Committee of the Red Cross, he contributed to the construction of the orthopaedic center in Kabul. He traveled in conflict areas such as Bosnia, Kosovo, South Sudan, Iraq, Afghanistan and many others.

Comte directed and produced his first feature film in 3D, The Girl from Nagasaki, retelling of the classic opera, Madame Butterfly, in which Puccini’s tragic heroine, emerging from the ashes of the atomic bomb, begins her fateful story of obsession for an American pilot.

ERAN SHAKINE

1962

Eran Shakine was born in 1962 in Israel, to a French father and Hungarian mother. Both were survivors of the Shoah who came to Israel after the Second World War.

After living in Paris, London and New York City, he currently divides his time between Tel Aviv and London. Shakine has had solo shows in The Drawing Center in New York, as well as in London, Paris, Brussels, Toronto and Tel Aviv. His works are in the permanent collections of the British Museum, London; Ludwig Museum, Aachen, Germany; Tel Aviv Museum of Art, Israel and the Israel Museum, Jerusalem, as well as in many corporate and private collections. His series A Muslim, a Christian and a Jew was on display for the first time in Germany.

DANIEL ORSON YBARRA

1957-now

Born in Uruguay, Daniel Orson Ybarra became interested in Art from the age of 12 through a correspondence in the form of drawings from Mexico City.


At the age of 18, he embarked on an 8-year adventure, which brought him to South and North America, Europe, Scandinavia, North Africa, and the Gulf countries.
In 1984, Daniel Orson Ybarra moved to Geneva where he spent most of his time, with Barcelona, a city in which he collaborated with architects with projects on space and a relationship with air and lightness.

Daniel Orson Ybarra’s work was presented with individual exhibitions as well as private collections. Including the Atarazanas Museum (Spain) & the R.R. collection (Spain).

 

 

Nancy Vuylsteke de Laps

1967-now

Nancy Vuylsteke de Laps was born on the 19th of April in 1967, in Anvers, Belgium. She started her education by studying classical sculpture at the Bruges Fine-Arts Academy.

Her real education took place in Paris where she was lucky enough to be an apprentice of Noorzadé Brener (whose whereabouts are currently unknown ) and she was a former student of Ossip Zadkine who had his own studio near Montparnasse.

Under Nuzarde Brener’s leadership Nancy had learned to express the mystery of human body, although she studied it only “visually”.

For this artist sculpture was a body and life lesson, transmission of the forms in their true state.

Catherine Zoubtchenko

1937- now

The art of Catherine Zoubtchenko, through Abstraction, offers us a universe, landscapes, geographies, where reign – she tells us “balance and harmony”.


Thanks to the vocabulary of pure colors and lines of Abstraction, it is indeed possible to reach the universal. 

Unlike his master Lanskoy, Zoubchenko did not confine himself to what Mondrian polemically called “pathetic lyricism” as an expression of struggle and combat, sometimes of tragedy, as “a reflection of the unconscious desire to free oneself from the oppression of imbalance.

 

VINCENT LEMAITRE 

1969-now

Vincent Lemaitre is a French abstract painter. He is a promising artist with great potential.

Vincent Lemaitre’s paintings are life-like and live for themselves. They are raw and impressive as they get right to the point. Between modernity and tradition, they call out to the spectator who is immersed in an abstract and a blurry universe.

Vincent Lemaitre has been developing his practice for 15 years, his works are original and innovative. They are composed of glued, torn or lacerated paper on canvas.

Through this combination of collage with abstract painting, Lemaitre is able to display unique work, created with repeated patterns and the same background.

“I seek a primitive painting, incantatory, before or after civilization, a face to face with a human stripped of everything, something raw and direct that liberates other worlds and refers to its own essence.

It is a long-term approach. Over the past fifteen years I have been experimenting with the plastic effects of glued paper and then ripped, scraped, washed out, more generally, altered paper.

With the support of painting, I developed this unique technique of painting / collage proper to my approach, in which I experience simple concepts related to sign, rhythm, repetition and color.”

Igor Novikov

1961-now

Igor Alekseevich Novikov, a Russian artist, was born on the 2nd January 1961 in Ceadir-Lunga, Moldova, in the family of the artist Novikov Alexey Ivanovich who is a member of the USSR Union of Artists, and an academician of the Academy of Arts of Russia. Igor Novikov belongs to the generation of Moscow’s non-conformist artists, whose creative development was in the era of the collapse of the Soviet Union.

In 1967 Igor Alekseevich Novikov went to the school of drawing in the House of Pioneers in the city of Chisinau. In 1970 he entered the Art School I. Repin Chisinau, and in 1980 graduated from it. A year later he entered the Moscow Academy of Arts, where he studied in the workshops of Yu. Korolev and T. Salakhov. In 1987 he graduated and received the state diploma of the artist-painter, in the same year he joined the Union of Artists of the USSR, and together with the artist S. Mironenko, he organized the association of young avant-garde artists “Furmanny Lane” in Moscow, which became part of the movement of Soviet non-conformism until its closure in 1991.

 

As a student from 1981, Igor had the opportunity to exhibit his work at various exhibition venues in Moscow, as well as abroad. In 1984 he created an art group and art center “ARX”. As part of the group he participated in his first exhibition in a communal apartment at Chistye Prudy. The first members of the group were Alexey Novikov, Andrei Kazakov, Yuri Andropov and Mikhail Lyubomudrov. In 1984, the Warsaw avant-garde club “Remont”, as part of a creative exchange under the program of the International Cultural Festival of the USSR and Warsaw, held the first exhibition of the Soviet artist Novikov in Poland. In 1986, a trip to India took place as part of a creative exchange on the program of the International Cultural Festival of the USSR and India. In 1988, a personal exhibition was held in the exhibition hall of the Hermitage Garden in Moscow. In 1988, Igor attended a lecture course at the Rietveld Academy, Amsterdam, and additionally held the Red and White exhibition at the Havenmuseum with the publication of a catalog. In May 1988, the opening of the personal apartment exhibition “Hyperborea” took place in the workshops on Furmanny Lane. In 1989, a large exhibition of non-conformism “Furmanniy Lane” was organized in Old Norbin’s Manufacture Warsaw with the publication of the catalog. In 1990, a large exhibition of non-conformism “Furmanniy Lane” in the Museum of Martigny, in Switzerland, with the publication of a catalog was organised. In the same year, in the State Art Gallery of the Moscow Foundation for Culture M. Gorbachev, there was an exhibition entitled Horizons, Mount Meru with his father with famous artist Novikov Alex Ivanovich, as well as an exhibition at the international art fair Herbst in Frankfurt, Germany and the exhibition “Soviet Art of Glasnost “in the gallery” Du Cygne “in Geneva, Switzerland. Numerous catalogs have been published.

 

 

Ulie Schwab

1950-now

Ulie Schwab is an abstract Swiss painter of German origin. After passing her senior high-school exams in a language school, she moved to the Lake Geneva region in the French-speaking part of Switzerland. Here she studied Traditional Chinese Medicine and later worked in this field. 

From a young age, she dedicated herself to various creative arts such as painting, sculpture, ceramics, Ikebana, dance and music. Among other institutions, she studied at the Ecole ABC de Paris and also under the tuition of the artist Pierre Beck.

 She opened her studio in Bursins in 2009. Since then, she has devoted herself entirely to painting, working as a freelance artist. Her style, her technique and blend of colors are very personal. The creation of reliefs, various color layers and the inclusion of minerals confer to her paintings a special light and reflection. Her favorite themes evolve around the energies of the universe, the energies of mankind and the energies of nature. 

The practice of Traditional Chinese Medicine as well as her passion for Asian culture have strongly influenced her artistic approach. Her paintings exhale at the same time a certain serenity and a positive energy which invite the viewer to slide into a state of well-being and to move at ease in his own free spaces. 

 

Salvador Dali

1904-1989

Salvador Dalí is among the most versatile and prolific artists of the 20th century and the most famous Surrealist. Though chiefly remembered for his painterly output, in the course of his long career he successfully turned to sculpture, printmaking, fashion, advertising, writing, and, perhaps most famously, filmmaking in his collaborations with Luis Buñuel and Alfred Hitchcock.

Dalí was renowned for his flamboyant personality and role of mischievous provocateur as much as for his undeniable technical virtuosity. In his early use of organic morphology, his work bears the stamp of fellow Spaniards Pablo Picasso and Joan Miró. His paintings also evince a fascination for Classical and Renaissance art, clearly visible through his hyper-realistic style and religious symbolism of his later work.

Mikhail Larionov
Mikhail Larionov

1881-1964

Vladimir Tatline
Vladimir Tatline

1885-1953

Olga Rozanova
Olga Rozanova

1886-1918

Lioubov Popova
Lioubov Popova

1889-1924

Ilia Tchachnik
Ilia Tchachnik

1902-1929

Jean Pougny
Jean Pougny

1894-1956

El Lissitzky
El Lissitzky

1890-1941

Gustav Klucis
Gustav Klucis

1895-1938

Ivan Klioune
Ivan Klioune

1873-1943

Robert Falk
Robert Falk

1886-1958

Georges Annenkov
Georges Annenkov

1889-1974

ANDRÉ LANSKOY
ANDRÉ LANSKOY

1902-1976

MAXIM KANTOR
MAXIM KANTOR

1957-now

MICHEL COMTE
MICHEL COMTE

1954-now

Igor Novikov
Igor Novikov

1961-now

Ulie Schwab
Ulie Schwab

1950-now

Salvador Dali
Salvador Dali

1904-1989